Inge Snethen-Hoogstra- Fall 2017 Honorable Mention

Meet Inge Snethen-Hoogstra, a junior at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who is majoring in Art History and Applied Linguistics. We would like to congratulate Ms. Snethen-Hoogstra on being selected as one of the three recipients of our Fall 2017 Honorable Mention Commendations for a Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarship. You can read Inge Snethen-Hoogstra’s artist statement below:

Reaching the halfway point of my college education has been an exciting time for me. Throughout my first four semesters here at UW-Milwaukee I have been able to familiarize myself more with the opportunities that a University can offer me. Through information sent by UWM and conversations with professors and fellow students the road to my graduation is now geared even more towards my interests. One opportunity that has greatly influenced my college experience is my acceptance in to the Honors College. Its concept of small classes and discussion based seminars has evolved my way of thinking and learning. It has been and will continue to be a positive influence on my college career. Thanks to the Honors College, I am well on my way to completing both my majors, Art History and Applied Linguistics.

Another interest of mine is helping others better understand the rich history of the world through art, language and culture. That is why I have joined PASS, Panther Academic Success Services, as a Supplemental Instruction Leader. I spend ten hours every week helping students better comprehend the material of Art 100: American Art and Culture…. My interest in foreign language and culture has further led me to apply for a Certificate in Ancient Mediterranean Studies. I remembered that I enjoyed studying Latin in middle school and learning about the history of Europe including the country where I grew up, the Netherlands…. After I finish my Bachelor degrees and my certificate I hope to be able to pursue a Master’s degree. Ultimately, I wish to obtain a PhD and become a professor at a University, doing what I love: teaching the        significance of art, culture, and history.

Essay Question: Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker each used very distinctive color palettes in their paintings. Please compare and contrast Fred & Eileen’s color palettes, taking into consideration their emphasis on thoughtful preparation, execution, and technique in their watercolor practice.

At first glance, Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker appear to have a similar style, choosing both watercolor for their medium and similar subject matter. But on viewing their works more intimately they go about depicting their chosen subject in distinct ways.

Architecture was Frederic Whitaker’s preferred subject matter and this shows in his use of stark lines and detailed facades. Especially in his work “Baroque Facade”, he uses different shades of grays, browns, and blues to create a crisp image, making it possible for the viewer to discern every detailed aspect of the building. His buildings are well thought-out structures that jump to the foreground. Frederic Whitaker is not afraid to show the meticulous study and planning that went into his works, as he keeps the line-work an important part of his paintings. This is not only the case with his architecture paintings, but with any subject matter he chose. His figure studies for example show a classical approach to anatomy, using the medium of watercolor to examine the play of light and shadow on a figure. He manages to create depth and perspective in his work by using mainly the same color in different shades of light and dark. As with his buildings, every line, curve, and wrinkle is shown.

Eileen Monaghan Whitaker, on the other hand, uses a more vibrant color palette and vivid forms. In her architecture paintings she creates a lively scene by adding spots of red and blue to bricks and rooftops. She also adds figures in such a way that it makes the scene active. They do not blend in with the architecture, but stand out to the viewer. The different shades on building facades create the illusion of detail. Brickwork and decorative architecture is suggested, stark lines are blended in with the rest of the surroundings. The brickwork is suggested in such a way that while she leaves it up to the viewer to complete the details, the hints she leaves make it flow naturally. The building becomes part of the scene as a whole, not its sole focus point. Her vibrant color palette is even more prevalent in her figure studies. Where Frederic had a more academic style, studying form and figure in a Renaissance way, like a DaVinci or Michelangelo. Eileen depicts her figures in a more everyday, whimsical way. Her paintings have a journalistic quality, like family photos of days at the beach, such as in “Con”, or a lazy day at home in “Ah! What Sweet Repose!”, reminding the viewer more of nineteenth century, European, Impressionist painters. Her figure paintings are snapshots of everyday life, whereas Frederic’s are posed and lengthy studies.

Their differences are even more pronounced in their flora and fauna paintings. Frederic Whitaker continues his crisp line-work and focus on figures. However, he does add a pop of color to these works. The color is focused on the flora of the works. The animals themselves are mostly quite monochrome, such as the elephants and the rhinos. The trees and plants are where the color can be found. Different shades of reds and browns are used to indicate leaves and flowers. Eileen Monaghan Whitaker uses color in a much more pronounced way. It is in her animals, plants, and backgrounds. Just like her architecture, the use of color all over blends the figures in with the background. The animals become part of the scene. There are no stark outlines, but flora and fauna weave in and out of each other.

After this closer look at the works of Frederic and Eileen it appears they do in fact have a very distinct style from one another. Even though they both use the medium of watercolor and both paint similar subject matter, they each have their own approach to painting. Eileen Whitaker embraces the use of watercolor fully, expressing its liquid quality. She blends her forms together, hinting at their specific shape and detail. She lightly brushes the paint across the canvas or lets it splotch and run across, emphasizing its watery aspect. Frederic uses the medium in a different way. His detail and linework make his watercolor almost mimic oil paint. He puts the emphasis on the subject matter, not the scene as a whole. He chooses a specific object and lets that stand out to the viewer, depicting it in full detail.

Despite this difference, it is no surprise that they exhibited together and supported each other’s work. The way their works contrast allows them to complete one another. Eileen’s work complements Frederic’s and vice versa.

Holly Mazzio – Spring 2017 Honorable Mention

Meet Holly Mazzio, a Senior at Kutztown University, who is majoring in Studio Art/Painting. We would like to congratulate Ms. Mazzio on being selected as one of the two recipients of our Spring 2017 Honorable Mention Commendations for a Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarship:

“If there is one thing I don’t need to be told twice, it’s that pursuing a career in the arts isn’t an easy road. My path to get where I am currently in my artistic career has been anything but enjoyable, although I have learned some of my most defining qualities as a person and an artist during this time.  I have been able to learn how to turn difficult or challenging ordeals into learning experiences that benefit me and my future. Having been diagnosed with a learning disability at a young age, this had made many obstacles in my educational life starting as early as first grade. Following my passion to become an artist however, made for the most difficult and seemingly impossible road to take…Choosing to face the tough things in life has given me chances to show others just how serious and how far I am willing to go to achieve my goals. It fuels my passion to work hard and to be grateful for the chances I get to show people how much my work means to me.  I hope to find many opportunities in which my art will been seen by others who may also begin to believe in my desire to succeed at what I love.”

Chelsea NY, 2016  ©Holly Mazzio

Patco, 2016 ©Holly Mazzio

You’re Among Friends, South of the Border by Frederic Whitaker

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A Surprising Find from the Whitaker Photo Archives

There are times when an image crosses your desk, and it captures your attention, despite its rather ordinary composition. In this instance, that image arrived in the form of a small photo depicting an artist standing at the edge of a cliff, looking rather pleased with himself as he grasps the familiar leg of an easel holding his plein air painting. There was nothing particularly striking about the photo itself, and at this first meeting, I merely logged it as interesting, but moved on to other pressing matters. It was the second time the photograph caught my eye, as I was perusing the Whitaker image archives, that I felt compelled to pass it along to the Foundation board, along with a query asking if anyone knew the gentleman in the photo, or could provide any contextual information about why this image might appear in the Whitaker photo archives.

0419_Roy Mason friend of Whitakers_SMAs it so happens, this smiling gentleman, clad in a jaunty angled fedora, was none other than famous watercolor artist Roy Mason. Roy and his wife Lena were longtime friends of the Whitakers, who they met in 1940s while both couples resided in New York. When the Masons moved to La Jolla, CA in the early 1960s, it would be a combination of their warm influence and the enchanting culture and climate of La Jolla, which would persuade Fred and Eileen to join their friends by moving to the area in 1965. Over the coming decades, the friendship between the Masons and Whitakers would continue to grow as both couples flourished within the elite artist community of La Jolla and San Diego. Fred and Roy’s paintings were even featured alongside each other in the late 1960s as part of a group exhibition celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the La Jolla Art Association. 

In Roy and Lena, Fred and Eileen found kindred artistic souls, as reflected by the words of Eileen Monaghan Whitaker in the book Contrasts that Complement, where she remarks that

“It was natural to fall in love with Roy the instant you met him – everyone did…Roy was a bright man with broad interests, and a fine painter as well! There was never a more attractive couple than Roy and Lena. It was wonderful for us to have the Masons, such good friends and stimulating people, so close.” (Jennings, 53)

Whether it was hosting a social gathering for the arts, exchanging advice, introducing one another to collectors and patrons, or inspiring each other to continue to refine their skills and achieve new heights of personal and professional success, the legacy of the unique, decades long friendship between the Whitakers and Masons would be the enrichment of both their contemporary artistic community, as well as future generations of watercolor artists.

Eleonor Botoman – Fall 2016 Scholarship Winner

EleonorBotomanPortrait_editMeet Eleonor Botoman, a freshman at Barnard College, who is majoring in English and Art History. We would like to congratulate Eleonor on being selected as one of three recipients of our Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarships for the Fall 2016 term. As part of the application process, Eleonor was asked to submit an essay response to a question about the Whitakers and their work. You can read Eleonor’s artist statement and essay below:

 

Artist Statement

As a double major in English and Art History, I’ve set my sights on exploring the art world through art criticism. I currently attend Barnard College, a women’s college in New York City, and I’ve spent my first year studying art history and architecture, researching internship opportunities for next fall, and wrote for the Journal of Art Criticism (JAC). This new student publication had its first issue release in early May and I am currently writing more pieces to be published in the summer and fall semester. I’ve also contributed to Postcrypt Art Gallery, an organization atColumbia University that puts on themed exhibitions of student artwork covering a wide range of mediums from installations, digital design, paintings, and sculpture.

Being in New York, I’ve been able to discover new developments in the art world by exploring all of the museums and galleries just a few subway stops away, and my professors, experts in the art history and architecture field, have guided me through not only the history of art, but also where the future of art is going.

As I begin my writing classes in the fall, I’m eager to develop my writing skills and use the analytic knowledge I gain from English to produce criticisms and theories of my own. I want to question artistic choices, draw comparisons and relationships across movements, understand the artist’s influences and inspirations, and place contemporary works into greater historical contexts. The skills I learn in writing will help me articulate my ideas in ways as creative as the artists I choose to discuss. However, I don’t want to keep all of my learning strictly on-campus.

With the fall semester just a few months away, I’ve already begun applying to internships in different organizations in order to further immerse myself within the art world. Some of these organizations include Artsty.net, a website that not only produces articles but also keeps track of artists’ profiles and pieces as well as guides to auctions and various galleries. There is also Magnus, a new app that identifies the work of art you’re looking at and provides you with all of its information including the artist, the gallery it belongs to, and the current sale price. I am also looking to work for ArchDaily, an architecture journal that looks at up-and-coming architects, explores new developments in design, and studies the impact of contemporary projects (both residential and public works) on the world today.

Essay Question: Compare and contrast Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker’s watercolors depicting Mexican culture

Mexico has been a source of inspiration for many writers and artists over the years, from the Beat poets’ trips south of the border to Diego Rivera’s grand murals of indigenous people. The Whitakers felt this strong pull to Mexico, and captured their awe in beautiful watercolor paintings. Both Eileen and Frederic’s works project emotion into the viewer. The flickering effects of the watercolor evoke a bright Mexican energy. Frederic and Eileen’s pieces may share subject matter, but their individual perception of Mexico causes them to splinter into two subjects of focus: Eileen studies the Mexican people while Frederic documents the Mexican earth, bringing a narrative quality to the forefront of his compositions. In an exploration of their differences, the watercolor artists together produce a whole, richly dynamic image of the power of this Latin-American land.

Eileen Whitaker explores Mexico through its people. Her warm portraits use vivid color to bring a face to a kind of Latin-American energy. She captures moments of daily life, brightened with whites and reds. The figures themselves, however, stand almost rigid poses. She does not use Impressionist brushstrokes to create her pictures. Subjects are rendered to as close a realism that can come with watercolor paints, people documented as if each moment she sees is a photograph. Princess Mariposa (1989) captures the woman with a realistic lightness and her dreamy expression with the rainbow patterned fabrics of her traditional dress. However, there is no intense overlapping of motifs or color in the composition. The mural in the corner, the leaves, the hummingbird, and the butterflies that bloom from behind the woman are included as motifs to further emphasize her identity. The flat white wall ensures no distraction. Eileen sees the people and their lives as the true expression of Mexican tradition, worn in their clothing.

Frederic’s interpretation of the lives of Mexican people emits a more rugged and masculine quality. In the Poultry Merchant (1967), he uses rougher strokes, yet overlaps the washed out tones to create delicate shadows and streaks of sun-brightened white across the feathers. Unlike Eileen, he does not paint the Mexican people with emotion. The merchant’s face appears with only a few minimal strokes while the chickens, the blanket, and his handkerchief are rendered with precision. Eileen captures the expressive quality of the locals’ faces, punctuating their portraits with richly colored cloth, while Frederic defines the Mexican people by traditional objects they use in their lives, carrying into a greater narrative quality of his series of paintings. Two paintings show this documentary quality: Dawn, Nov 2nd (1968) and the Lettuce Pickers (1966).¹ One takes place on an urban street while the other shows men at work in the fields, however Frederic produces two very similar studies on the power of the Mexican landscape. Watercolor is not a painting medium that encourages exact lines so the artist must make the choice to place the most important aspect of the painting right at the foreground where the image can be meticulously rendered. In both Dawn, Nov 2nd and the Lettuce Pickers, he places Mexico at the forefront while the flickering forms of the people linger towards the background. Only one individual sits close to the viewer in Dawn, Nov 2nd, and it should be noted that he wears the most elaborate costume. The Lettuce Pickers appear as generalized forms as well, but in the foreground Frederic places a cardboard box in the corner as a symbol of their agricultural work. He brings the rows of lettuce forward before stretching them all the way towards back of the canvas, sending the viewer’s eye back into a vast and fertile land. Eileen shows individual identities but Frederic uses the Mexican people to create a larger history of a collective identity. Their faces have a formless quality, only enough to differentiate a person within a group. In the darkened daylight of Dawn, Frederic punctuates the men with bright yellow caps. In the Lettuce Pickers, hats play a similar role. This is a symbol of male traditional dress, a practical one that keeps them cool under the hot southern sun. The Lettuce Pickers could become faded into the monotony of the green field, but their bright hats emphasize their hard work. As with the boxes, the hats are a symbol of hardworking spirit, similar to Eileen’s representation of the women’s energy in electric fabrics.

A final point of contrast between the two artists arises with Frederic’s use of a darker palette. Eileen doesn’t shy away from duskier tones, but she prefers bright pinks to her husband’s shadowy blues. This comparison is drawn between two paintings: Eileen’s Se Vende Ajos (1990) and Frederic’s Flower Market (1977). Both pieces address the bustling Mexican marketplace, however there is variation within color schemes. Eileen’s painting projects warmth with hues of orange, reds, and purples. The figures are arranged so that each item for sale can be represented. Oranges and garlic are presented by the merchants and fabrics draping in the background are only partially blocked by the man in the center while the rest of their patterns are unobstructed. The scene is inviting, decorated for the viewer. Frederic’s work, on the other hand, shows a louder, busier scene. All of the shapes reduce in definition to enhance the frenzied setting. The women’s dresses merge together in tones of blues and purples. Sellers carry clouds of blossoms. The sky is darker, drawing attention to the flowers and the dynamic movement of the crowd. In Eileen’s painting, the man engages with the viewer, welcomes them into the selling space. Frederic places the viewer behind the women sitting in the shade with their children. They do not participate, perhaps because they cannot keep up with the chaos of the market, and the viewer is encouraged to observe in order to learn about the culture. Frederic’s paintings capture a dynamic story of Mexican life while Eileen’s works follow a more stagnant tradition of portraiture and elegant expression of culture. 

¹Unbeknownst to the author, the setting for Frederic Whitaker’s watercolor painting “Lettuce Pickers” was Salinas, California, not Mexico, as suggested. This is an understandable misconception as the painting is included with collections featuring Mexico and Mexican culture, and details regarding where “Lettuce Pickers,” was painted were not available to the author as of the writing of this essay.

Carrie Taylor – Fall 2016 Scholarship Winner

CarrieTaylor PortraitMeet Carrie Taylor, a senior at Georgia State University, who is majoring in Studio Art. We would like to congratulate Carrie on being selected as one of three recipients of our Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarships for the Fall 2016 term:

[I am] only 6 classes shy of my B.F.A. degree, [and] upon graduation I will be able to be financially independent while working in my field. I have been a working artist for a decade and have a stunning portfolio, but often I am overlooked [in] the application screening process since I lack a Bachelor’s degree.

The B.F.A Studio Art program grooms the working artist. In my final year, I will work closely with professional artists and have dedicated studio hours. It will teach me the boundaries needed to successfully raise my infant son as a single parent and work in an unconventional profession with opportunities for office hours and freelance work. I have always been a great student, as I maintain an above B grade point average, and I have received recognition and awards in both my educational and work environments. I would like to believe that hard work does not go unnoticed, and though we may face challenges, we can overcome them. I want my son to believe in himself as he believes in me.

Going to class for me is attending my studio. It is another place of work. I have found through the challenges of my past year it is also a place of retreat and healing. I have had a dormant interest in art therapy, and if I can achieve my short-term goals I can continue to believe that despite challenges, art is a constant and a place of serenity for healing. I would like to further pursue qualifications and responsibility in order to be part of the promise and promotion of creative expression in art therapy.

Carrie Taylor_My Sunshine_4x6_2015

“My Sunshine” 2015, 4 x 6 in. ©Carrie Taylor

Carrie Taylor_Daisy_4.25x5.5_2015

“Daisy” 2015, 4.25 x 5.5 in ©Carrie Taylor

Xiaoyan Zhao – Fall 2016 Scholarship Winner

XiaoyanZhaoPortraitMeet Xiaoyan Zhao, a junior at the California College of the Arts, who is majoring in Painting and Drawing. We would like to congratulate Xiaoyan on being selected as one of three recipients of our Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarships for the Fall 2016 term:

Ever since my grandfather passed away in March 2015, he had been the source of inspiration whenever I paint. Like other Alzheimer and Parkinson patients, my grandfather also endured similar symptoms such as gradually lost his memory, gradually lost the ability to read, speak, walk, swallow. In his final months, the only things he could do are blinking his eyes, sometimes tearing, and lifting fingers. From home to nursing house, from nursing house to hospital, in the three years at the end of grandfather’s life, what he experienced has become the experience of our family, grandfather and mine.

Life and death shock me deeply. Memory, family, time became my language of artistic expression. In this semester, I began tending to the pleasure of life, rather than thinking of death. Through this way of thinking life and death, joy and sadness to explore moderation philosophy, so as explore life and art.

I want to tell people with my painting: If your parents, or grandparents live alone or in the nursing home, go to visit them, because they may live in a very lonely place, they need us.

Xiaoyan Zhao, Grandfather, the loss of memory,22.5_30,2015

“Grandfather, the Loss of Memory” May 2015, 22.5 x 30 in. ©Xiaoyan Zhao

Xiaoyan Zhao, PARALLEL SPACE,22.5_30,2015

“Parallel Space” May, 2015, 22.5 x 30 in. ©Xiaoyan Zhao

 

Catherine Ross – Fall 2016 Honorable Mention

CatherineRossPortraitMeet Catherine Ross, a junior at Pacific Northwest College of Art, who is majoring in Painting. We would like to congratulate Ms. Ross on being selected as one of three recipients of our Fall 2016 Honorable Mention Commendations for a Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarship:

I am a multi-disciplinary artist working in Portland, Oregon. After spending the last ten years traveling in over 20 countries, learning Spanish, Portuguese and French while working as a painter, I returned to the States and am currently pursuing a BFA in painting at the Pacific NorthWest College of Art. Combining painting, video and sound, sculpture, and performance, I push the boundaries of media and materials to create hybrid works that explore the possibilities and limitations of the body. My work considers class, race and gender, the commodification of the body, labor, the forfeit of physicality for online avatars, obsessive self-documentation and consumption of one’s own image in the digital age. I have recently founded a painting club and movement/performance club at my college. I am currently creating an artists’ collective for women that encourages collaboration and support for female artists in my community. I plan to get an MFA after graduation, focusing on art and dance as ways to engage the local community and increase compassion and connection in local/national/global communities.

 

Constraint 2016 by Catherine Ross 16" x 20"

“Constraint” 2016, 16 x 20 in. ©Catherine Ross

Liberation 2016 by Catherine Ross 16" x 20"

“Liberation” 2016, 16 x 20 in. ©Catherine Ross

 

 

Yesenia Brambila – Fall 2016 Honorable Mention

Meet Yesenia Brambila, a junior at New York University, who is majoring in Classics and Fine Arts. We would like to congratulate Yesenia on being selected as one of three recipients of our Fall 2016 Honorable Mention Commendations for a Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarship. As an applicant for the Art History emphasis scholarship, Yesenia was asked to submit an essay responding to a question about the Whitakers and their work. You can read her essay and artist statement below:

Artist Statement

The ancient world of the Greeks and Romans and the art they produced have fascinated me for as long as I can remember. Every course I take at NYU is an attempt to understand this era of art more and to bridge the gap between my time and theirs. I have never been as passionate about anything as I am with this. My dream is to receive a doctorate in this area and to become a professor of classical art. Though I would be the first in my family to receive a doctorate, I believe I am capable of doing it because I have the work ethic and dedication needed to achieve this dream. I joined the Presidential Honors Scholars Program at NYU for the opportunity to write a senior’s honor thesis in the Classics (which, as a soon to be junior, I have already started conducting research for). And for the past two semesters, I have taken two languages (French and Latin) at once. Next semester, I plan to continue with Latin while adding on both Ancient Greek and German. I do all these things not only to prepare myself for graduate school, but to give myself a better understanding of the ancient world. 

Essay Question: Compare and contrast Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker’s watercolors depicting Mexican culture

In their watercolor paintings, Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker show that though they share both a similar style and a similar interest in depicting Mexican culture, the two artists focus on various aspects of this subject. While Frederic Whitaker shows a greater interest in painting the full picture of Mexican culture, Eileen Monaghan Whitaker shows a greater interest in the people that represent this culture. Rather than choosing to depict all of the elements that compose Mexican culture, Eileen focuses instead on the personalization of the figures she depicts. 

It is evident that these artists shared not only a marriage, but also thematic content in their works. For example, Eileen’s “Bird Watcher” and Frederic’s “Birdwatchers” is a clear example of the two artists sharing a specific subject. But, they represent them in their own unique ways. In Eileen’s version of this subject, the main, and only, figure in the painting has her back turned to us and she is assumingly watching the bird in front of her. With the figure placed so close to the foreground and her back turned, it’s as if the viewers are meant to feel as though they are intruding on the woman, which gives this scene a sense of intimacy. Frederic’s somber and gray version of the scene, on the other hand, is composed of two figures with one of them holding an infant on her back. The figures are shown side-by-side in profile. The viewers are able to follow their downcast eyes to the numerous birds at their feet. And so, unlike Eileen’s version, here the viewer is not an intruder, but simply a spectator to the scene.

In these paintings, both artists also share stylistic elements in their depiction. For example, both provide merely hints of the background to the scene. Both backgrounds are painted with quick and wispy strokes and so the viewers can understand that they are not what is important in understanding this scene. Also, though the use of color in these paintings will soon be elaborated on, a continuity in the color scheme is visible in both paintings throughout their respected scenes. The vibrant colors in Eileen’s depiction are visible in every area such as the figure, the bird, and the vague background, just as the somber tones are visible in Frederic’s figures, birds, and his just as vague background.   

These color schemes are significant towards understanding the difference between the way these artists represent this Mexican culture. Despite the fact that her only figure has her back turned to the viewers, Eileen shows a concern for personalizing the woman. In the painting, she wears a colorful dressing and a headdress that matches its vibrant color scheme. A large, jeweled earring hangs from the ear visible to the viewers. With all these elements of personalization, we are able to get a sense of what this woman’s tastes in clothing and jewelry are. To contrast this, Frederic’s scene lacks both vibrant colors and personalization. His two figures wear large, dark cloaks that hang down their bodies which enhances their hanging heads and downcast eyes and except for their gaze towards the birds, there is no sense of their interests. This imagery of hanging and dark colors is typically associated with mourning, and it is through this association that the somberness within the scene is translated.

Now, this somberness does not suggest that Frederic believes Mexican culture itself to be somber and melancholic. In terms of what it says about the culture, his painting’s lack of personalization and the placement of the figures gives the spectators a direct view of the scene. Frederic does not rely on the identity of his figures to tell the story of this culture. He relies on the full composition of the work to tell a complete story of this culture, while Eileen tells a complete story over the shoulder of a vibrant and tasteful woman.

Of course, one painting cannot act as an indication of an artist’s entire body of work, and therefore act as a spokesperson for that artist’s approach to their subject; however, these two works are appropriate for illustrating the connections and discrepancies between a husband’s and a wife’s work. In their explicit sharing of a subject and implicit variations in that subject’s presentation, the comparison of Eileen’s “Bird Watcher” and Frederic’s “Birdwatchers” can be regarded as a microcosm to the comparison of the artists themselves. These are the paintings that show just to what extent Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker differ in their depictions of Mexican culture. And they show just how important not only style and subject are, but the eyes of the artist translating that subject into painting.

Jacob Garcia – Fall 2016 Honorable Mention

Meet Jacob Garcia, a junior at University of Houston, who is majoring in Fine Art. We would like to congratulate Jacob on being selected as one of three recipients of our Fall 2016 Honorable Mention Commendations for a Frederic Whitaker and Eileen Monaghan Whitaker Foundation Scholarship:

 At the University [of Houston] I hope to gain a better understanding of what makes artwork great. So far, I have been learning the fundamentals as I just transferred from a Community College. I have learned important lessons in my classes on how to make artwork stand out in excellence. I learned about composition, and using it to make the piece interesting, dynamic, and to even help guide your eyes around the artwork…

Watercolor seems to be under-appreciated as a medium because I’ve had people look down on me for using them as if I was a child playing with paint. For me watercolor is more than that because it can create beautiful artwork with various techniques and have a transparent look that may be harder to achieve with other paint. After I finish my studies at the University I would like to get a job where I’m able to paint on a daily basis and use watercolor of course. It could be any job ranging from designing hallmark cards with watercolor or working on designs for a film company. I would also like to work from commissions, not only because it’s a guaranteed paycheck but because I know people will ask me paint things I haven’t before. It would be beneficial in that regard because I don’t always get a chance to paint some random texture like wood grain or some things I haven’t thought of yet.

I know my skill is only going to get better because I practice almost every day. I push myself really hard to get where I want to be and even if it’s a little watercolor sketch of a flower or a full figure study that takes a few day, I try to paint every day…It takes many hours to finish a watercolor painting and I want to dedicate my time to my art.

JacobGarcia_Anathematised_edit

“Anathematised” 2016, 11 x14 in. ©Jacob Garcia

 

 

"Harley Quinn Study," 2016 7.5 x 11 in. ©Jacob Garcia

“Harley Quinn Study” 2016, 7.5 x 11 in. ©Jacob Garcia